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Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com
Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com
Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com
Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com
Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com
Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com
Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com
Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com
Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com
Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks -  - TheGeekLeak.com

Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks

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$14.00
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$8.99

Stainless Steel Dragon Chopsticks

 

THE HISTORY OF CHOPSTICKS:

According to the California Academy of Sciences, which houses the Rietz Collection of Food Technology, chopsticks were developed about 5,000 years ago in China. The earliest versions were probably twigs used to retrieve food from cooking pots. When resources became scarce, around 400 BC, crafty chefs figured out how to conserve fuel by cutting food into small pieces so it would cook more quickly. This new method of cooking made it unnecessary to have knives at the dinner table—a practice that also jibed with the non-violent teachings of Confucius, as expressed in one of his numerous quotable quotations: "The honorable and upright man keeps well away from both the slaughterhouse and the kitchen. And he allows no knives on his table."

By 500 AD, chopsticks had spread to Japan, Vietnam and Korea. Early Japanese chopsticks were used strictly for religious ceremonies, and were made from one piece of bamboo joined at the top, like tweezers. Contrary to the frequent Western misconception, Thais do not commonly use chopsticks.

During the Chinese dynastic times, silver chopsticks were sometimes used because it was believed they would turn black if they came in contact with poisoned food. This practice must have led to some unfortunate misunderstandings—it's now known that silver has no reaction to arsenic or cyanide, but can change color if it comes into contact with garlic, onions, or rotten eggs, all of which release hydrogen sulfide. Read more at: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-history-of-chopsticks-64935342/